Why Twitter Hates Math

I am bad at implementing stuff myself. So when it comes to gathering data, I always have to rely on some smart dude(tte) on the Internet to provide me fool proof tools to do my data gathering. Recently, i found a tool to get data from twitter in the most idiot proof way possible.

So i could finally gather data for my project: “How do people feel about math?”
To anticipate the outcome: Not very positive…

“Mathematics is a place where you can do things which you can’t do in the real world”. [Marcus du Sautoy]

Continue reading Why Twitter Hates Math

Proof: Wikipedia

“A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee [and wikipedia articles] into theorems” [A. Rényi]

In the last couple of weeks (or months, I lost track of space and time!) I tried to prove something. 



This “something” turned out not to be as trivial as I thought it would be and I had to invoke the power of a lot of mathematical concepts. Although I studied math, a lot of things were new to me (or I just forgot them) and I had to (re)learn quite a bit. Of course taking courses or reading books would be too time consuming, so I used Wikipedia as a reference (Disclaimer: Do not admit doing that in real life). Continue reading Proof: Wikipedia

Soccer Analytics Part 3: Transitivity of Soccer

“If Bayern Munich won 3:1 against FC  Barcelona and Borussia Dortmund won 3:0 against Barcelona, then Dortmund will win 6:1 against Munich.” We all did this calculations when we were younger! What we didn’t know back then is that we implicitly assumed a strong transitivity in soccer and therefore a high predictability of results. Because when we know that A beat B and B beat C, than we can be quite sure that A will beat C. But of course we all know that soccer does not work like that. But how transitive is soccer actually. That is, how often can we observe a triplet A beats B, B beats C and A beats C?
This entry will deal with this question and also compare the transitivity of soccer with other sports around the world.

Continue reading Soccer Analytics Part 3: Transitivity of Soccer

The Walk of Pi: In 736036 Days Digits Around the World

Happy $pi$ day everyone! But it is not just an ordinary $pi$ day, no, it is the ultimate $pi$ day!

3/14/15 9:26:53
To celebrate this awesome day, i decided to write an entry devoted to the beauty of $pi$. Specifically, about the random walk of $pi$.

 

Continue reading The Walk of Pi: In 736036 Days Digits Around the World

Soccer Analytics Part 2: Why Al Kuwait SC was (probably not) the Best Team in 2013

In the first part of my Soccer Analytics series, I talked about general statistics of my dataset of the season 2013. As a reminder, i scraped all results from 177 domestic leagues and intra continental cups world wide. This entry will deal with the question “Who was the best team in 2013?” according to network analysis and why the result is (most likely) wrong.

Continue reading Soccer Analytics Part 2: Why Al Kuwait SC was (probably not) the Best Team in 2013